World’s Strangest

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Famous Novelists on Symbolism in Their Work and Whether It Was Intentional

It was 1963, and 16-year-old Bruce McAllister was sick of symbol-hunting in English class. Rather than quarrel with his teacher, he went straight to the source: McAllister mailed a crude, four-question survey to 150 novelists, asking if they intentionally planted symbolism in their work. Seventy-five authors responded. Here’s what 12 of them had to [...]

The Quick 10: 10 Literary Smack-Downs, Quips, and Squabbles

There’s an adage they give you when you receive your name badge at the door of Writer Land: “You only compete with yourself.” While most authors hold true to this (at least in public), there are those who make time to spend bashing their fellow wordslingers. Here are ten cringe-worthy examples. 1. Mark Twain vs. Ambrose [...]

A Writer Grows in Brooklyn – part 2

Yesterday, you were shocked to learn how many amazing writers once called Brooklyn ‘home.’ (You were shocked, weren’t you?) Today, we’ll take a closer look at some of those writers and learn some odd facts about them. For instance, most people say Truman Capote formally established the non-fiction novel in 1965 with In Cold Blood. Cold [...]

A Writer Grows in Brooklyn – part 1

Truman Capote lived in Brooklyn by choice, and so did I, once… Brooklyn Heights, to be more exact. Actually, the Northern part of Brooklyn Heights, if you want to be even more exact. Or, more precisely, Cranberry Street —the little three-block long street where the movies Moonstruck and Three Days of the Condor were filmed. When [...]

How to Not Kill Yourself and Still Be a Writer

In February 2009, writer Elizabeth Gilbert gave a funny, inspiring talk at the TED conference in California. In her talk, Gilbert reflects on her experience after writing the hit memoir “Eat, Pray, Love” and what happened afterwards — how everyone expected her to fail at her next project (or at least not duplicate that success). [...]