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Shazam, Shlemiel, Shlimazel

I’ve used Shazam on and off over the years to I.D. songs I either forgot the names of or just never knew. But the real test of any music recognition software is whether or not it can tell me what’s playing on a classical music station. This is where you really need the app to come through because, let’s face it, it could be 30 minutes or more before the piece ends and the radio announcer comes back on to tell you. Sadly, every time I’ve tried, the app has come up empty. I’ve even tested it with well-known pieces, like Barber’s Adagio for Strings. Instead of coming back with at least “The theme from Platoon,” Shazam says the piece is “unrecognized.” What would Samuel Barber say?

Deciphering classical music presents a lot of challenges. For starters, recordings are indistinguishable when you’re talking about a 12-second sample size. For example, there are more than 200 recordings of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony! Not quite like learning the beat of a B52s song, is it?

Tempi vary wildly from recording to recording and, as I understand it, it’s the tempo/beat mapping that Shazam is really working off of. But technology will improve, rest assured. The Shazams of the future will surely be able to not only distinguish between Mozart’s Requiem and Berlioz’s Requiem, but the hundreds of recordings of each. Until then, well, I guess the beat goes on…

Have any funny or interesting experiences with music recognition software? Let us know in the comments below.

Check out all the ON MUSIC posts here.

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Date
September 7th, 2011

Author
Stranger to the World

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